Happy birthday mr. GNU

It was the early eighties, a day like any other at the MIT. And a printer was not working. The Artificial Intelligence Laboratory programmer Richard Stallman did his best to fetch the source code of the driver from the manufacturer to fix it, but there was no chance. The code was closed, and this was definitely a huge problem. Because if we give up sharing our work, we cease to work for the common good. And this should never happen in science.

All of a sudden, something as simple as the possibility to modify a driver became the symbol of an epic struggle. The struggle between greed and generosity, individualism and solidarity, profit and redistribution, patents and free knowledge and, to some extent and in a more philosophical fashion, between capitalism and anti-capitalism.

It was the September 27th 1983, and Richard Stallman was announcing his challenge to the world: ensure that the source code flows freely. The GNU project was born.

Over the years, a huge crowd of any kind of programmers joined the movement, rising the flag of free knowledge as a means for the redistribution of wealth, and for the spread of democracy. A lot of admirable and romantic ideals that shocked the world as they proved to be effective enough to beat up the informatics bad guys. Although the efforts of software majors to promote their closed and patent- based way to software, the free software movement has been the one to dictate the metrics and trace the groove of many aspects of the evolution of IT market. The encounter with Torvald’s kernel linux, the birth of the main distribution projects, the extension of free software principles to all the aspects of cognitive production that led Lawrence Lessig to found Creative Commons in 2001. Year by year, open source software have spread over, becoming the standard for almost everything that is leading the internet nowadays,  including Google and Facebook.

A lesson that we still need. Openness is fair, and it is productive. As the debate on Open Science spreads up, the example of Free Software still traces a way we must follow.

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